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Enabling Acts: The Hidden Story of How the Americans with Disabilities Act Gave the Largest US Minority Its Rights

Enabling Acts The Hidden Story of How the Americans with Disabilities Act Gave the Largest US Minority Its Rights The first significant book on the history and impact of the ADA the eyes on the prize moment for disability rights The Americans with Disabilities Act ADA is the widest ranging and most comprehensive

  • Title: Enabling Acts: The Hidden Story of How the Americans with Disabilities Act Gave the Largest US Minority Its Rights
  • Author: Lennard Davis
  • ISBN: 9780807071564
  • Page: 279
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The first significant book on the history and impact of the ADA the eyes on the prize moment for disability rights The Americans with Disabilities Act ADA is the widest ranging and most comprehensive piece of civil rights legislation ever passed in the United States, and it has become the model for disability based laws around the world Yet the surprising story behinThe first significant book on the history and impact of the ADA the eyes on the prize moment for disability rights The Americans with Disabilities Act ADA is the widest ranging and most comprehensive piece of civil rights legislation ever passed in the United States, and it has become the model for disability based laws around the world Yet the surprising story behind how the bill came to be is little known.In this riveting account, acclaimed disability scholar Lennard J Davis delivers the first behind the scenes and on the ground narrative of how a band of leftist Berkeley hippies managed to make an alliance with upper crust, conservative Republicans to bring about a truly bipartisan bill Based on extensive interviews with all the major players involved including legislators and activists, Davis recreates the dramatic tension of a story that is anything but a dry account of bills and speeches Rather, it s filled with one indefatigable character after another, culminating in explosive moments when the hidden army of the disability community stages scenes like the iconic Capitol Crawl or an event some describe as deaf Selma, when students stormed Gallaudet University demanding a Deaf President Now From inside the offices of newly formed disability groups to secret breakfast meetings surreptitiously held outside the White House grounds, here we meet countless unsung characters, including political heavyweights and disability advocates on the front lines You want to fight an angered Ted Kennedy would shout in an upstairs room at the Capitol while negotiating the final details of the ADA Congressman Tony Coelho, whose parents once thought him to be possessed by the devil because of his epilepsy, later became the bill s primary sponsor There s Justin Dart, adorned in disability power buttons and his signature cowboy hat, who took to the road canvassing fifty states, and people like Patrisha Wright, also known as The General, Arlene Myerson or the brains, architect Bob Funk, and visionary Mary Lou Breslin, who left the hippie highlands of the West to pursue equal rights in the marble halls of DC Published for the twenty fifth anniversary of the ADA, Enabling Acts promises to ignite readers in a discussion of disability rights by documenting this eyes on the prize moment for tens of millions of American citizens.

    • ✓ Enabling Acts: The Hidden Story of How the Americans with Disabilities Act Gave the Largest US Minority Its Rights || É PDF Download by Å Lennard Davis
      279 Lennard Davis
    • thumbnail Title: ✓ Enabling Acts: The Hidden Story of How the Americans with Disabilities Act Gave the Largest US Minority Its Rights || É PDF Download by Å Lennard Davis
      Posted by:Lennard Davis
      Published :2018-02-25T06:50:24+00:00

    One thought on “Enabling Acts: The Hidden Story of How the Americans with Disabilities Act Gave the Largest US Minority Its Rights

    1. Ellie on said:

      Enabling Acts is a fascinating, in-depth examination of the history of the Americans with Disabilities Act was created and passed in 1990. Since I have taught this legislation to my students, I thought I was familiar with it but this book revealed much information about which I was unaware.There are wonderful portraits of the various (and many) people involved in passing this legislation. I was both heartened by the cross-party lines support (disability affects people of all political affiliatio [...]

    2. Morris on said:

      "Enabling Acts" is thorough history of the ADA from it's conception to its passage. Many don't realize how much was changed for those with physical and cognitive disabilities with the passage of the act, nor do they realize just how difficult it was to get passed. This book is well-researched and includes many facts. It can be a difficult read and meander some at times, so I would not recommend it for those looking for a light or easy read.This unbiased review is based on a book was won through [...]

    3. victor harris on said:

      Although a step forward, the Civil Rights Act and other legislation of the 1960s did not adequately address the needs of millions with disabilities. Building on that legislation, various segments of that population aligned to become a more potent lobbying effort and exert their influence in the political arena. They managed to recruit support from both Democrats and Republicans who were sympathetic to their cause. It would take until 1990 during the Bush I administration until their efforts were [...]

    4. Kristi Richardson on said:

      “The ADA is an excellent example of a bipartisanship no longer extant but made possible when a Republican President, George H. W. Bush, worked together with a Democratic House and Senate.”I received this book as part of the First Reads program for an honest review.One in Five of every American is disabled, so I would venture to say that unless you are a hermit, you or someone you love is disabled. It is so easy to forget what life was like for the disabled in this country before the America [...]

    5. Nancy Kennedy on said:

      This book is an exhaustive treatment of how the Americans with Disabilities Act came to be proposed and passed in 1990. On the whole, there was far more detail than interested me, a person with no political leanings. But the author often focuses on the personalities involved, and that's when the narrative really engaged me. (It's why I like reading The Wall Street Journal the focus is always on the people rather than say, the convertible subordinated debentures.)The author delves into the famili [...]

    6. Matt Dean on said:

      Excellent Many sections of this book read like an episode of The West Wing. It is a pleasant read and a solid introduction to the ADA. The extensive notes allow for further research.

    7. Tansy on said:

      Even though it's American I found the book fascinating and engaging. It made me realise that Australia is a long way behind even though we are a first world country.I recommend this book for anyone interested with disabilities and human rights.

    8. Meredith on said:

      I was slow in starting this book, in part because of feeling generally depressed about how the ADA has failed in enforcement, particularly when it comes to employment protections. This is especially rich since the Republican justification for it was always “then more disabled people will be employed and won't need benefits.” After it passed the early court decisions totally shrunk the scope of what is or isn't a disability, to the extent that when two pilots were denied employment at United [...]

    9. Kara on said:

      Professor Lennard J. Davis has not produced a cutting-edge, controversial, or time-critical work of scholarship in disability studies in his new book Enabling Acts. His magnus opus has been published with some fanfare in celebration of the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, and consequently all critical discourse is set aside. The scope of the work is the history of this revolutionary legislation and its significance to a truly wide range of traditionally underserved and un [...]

    10. Winifred on said:

      Fascinating topic, and a well done. Interesting emphasis on the politics of how passing the ADA was accomplished related (and in some cases didn't relate) to the work of advocates. Nice acknowledgement of some of the unsung (and in some cases actually unknown) heroes who contributed on the political side, and some of the accidents of history and larger forces that led to and shaped the involvement of particular people.Engaging quotes and accounts from the people involved are included throughout [...]

    11. Linda Wright on said:

      A rollercoaster ride detailing the work prior to the the passage of the ADA twenty-five years ago. The twists and turns, negotiations and compromises in the political arena were from personal accounts.The book continues to describe the court cases which failed to understand the intent of the law and the pitfalls of the original legislation. The corrective language of the ADDA. Thanks to the Audible I was able to read this book.

    12. Krista on said:

      Incredibly in-depth and well-researched, this book shows the incredibly long journey it took to get the Americans with Disabilities Act created and passed. It gives great insight to the inner workings of the government and a peek into the lives of the politicians who helped create and pass this act.

    13. Toni on said:

      Sorry , I thought I finished my review on this but apparently only updated my status. This book was extremely valuable for anyone who wants or needs information on how the "disabilities act," or the more positive, "enabling acts," came to be born, and the widespread areas it covers. I won this book through a Giveaway, and I'm very appreciative. Thank you.

    14. Nicole on said:

      Dragged on a bit, but I suppose that's a good metaphor for the grueling and elongated effort it took to pass the ADA and subsequent enforcement. Hats off to the tireless advocates, organizers, behind-the-scenes staff and even politicians (*cringe*) that one of the most important pieces of US legislation become reality. Inclusion and equality all the way :)

    15. Scott Golden on said:

      [I received this book for free through First Reads.]Despite the tabloidistic [sic] subtitle (the story hasn't so much been "hidden" as it has just not been headline news) this is a relatively straightforward review of the people and events surrounding the landmark ADA legislation. Not a powerhouse of excitement, but well done all the same.

    16. Moira-ji on said:

      (If you liked this, see also The Bill of the Century by Clay Risen, re: the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964)

    17. Nanette on said:

      It is a miracle that the ADA was passed into law, and this book does a fabulous job showing it. I also appreciated that the author makes it abundantly clear that the ADA did not fix everything.

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