Charity Detox: What Charity Would Look Like If We Cared About Results

Robert D. Lupton

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Charity Detox: What Charity Would Look Like If We Cared About Results

Charity Detox What Charity Would Look Like If We Cared About Results In his previous book Toxic Charity Robert D Lupton revealed the truth about modern charity programs meant to help the poor and disenfranchised While charity makes donors feel better he argued it of

  • Title: Charity Detox: What Charity Would Look Like If We Cared About Results
  • Author: Robert D. Lupton
  • ISBN: 9780062307262
  • Page: 280
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In his previous book Toxic Charity, Robert D Lupton revealed the truth about modern charity programs meant to help the poor and disenfranchised While charity makes donors feel better, he argued, it often hurts those it seeks to help At the forefront of this burgeoning yet ineffective compassion industry are American churches, which spend billions on dependency producingIn his previous book Toxic Charity, Robert D Lupton revealed the truth about modern charity programs meant to help the poor and disenfranchised While charity makes donors feel better, he argued, it often hurts those it seeks to help At the forefront of this burgeoning yet ineffective compassion industry are American churches, which spend billions on dependency producing programs, including food pantries But what would charity look like if we instead measured it by its ability to alleviate poverty and needs That is the question at the heart of Charity Detox Drawing on his many decades of experience, Lupton outlines how to structure programs that actually improve the quality of life of the poor and disenfranchised He introduces many strategies that are revolutionizing what we do with our charity dollars and offers numerous examples of organizations that have successfully adopted these groundbreaking new models Only by redirecting our strategies and becoming committed to results, he argues, can charity truly become as transformative as our ideals.

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      Published :2018-02-19T01:50:12+00:00

    One thought on “Charity Detox: What Charity Would Look Like If We Cared About Results

    1. Lee Harmon on said:

      The author of Toxic Charity is at it again. Lupton insists that most of the work we do in the name of charity does more harm than good. Proclaiming that the only effective charity is the kind that asks more from those being served, rather than less, he lifts capitalism onto a pedestal and incriminates socialism and philanthropy as building dependency rather than affirming that the recipient also has something of value to offer.Lupton’s arguments are convincing. His focus is primarily on poor c [...]

    2. Lindsay on said:

      Still not what I was hoping for. It's an easy task to tell the church what we're doing wrong. We need guidance to do the right things in mission. If Lupton expanded on the last two pages and built a book around that, i'd be pleased.

    3. Janice Smith on said:

      I SO wanted to love this follow-up book to Toxic Charity, but in the end, it just didn't deliver the information that I was hoping to obtainwhat can an ordinary, everyday person do to help (not hurt) others? It seemed that much of the same information (mostly about what NOT to do) was repeated in this book. The missing link is guidance on exactly what to do. There is a summary of 8 things at the end of the book that is somewhat helpful, but I wanted more. Maybe it was just high expectations?!? T [...]

    4. Jenny U on said:

      I was thrown off by his misuse of the term "free market" in chapter 2, when the rest of his book discusses the importance of "ethical business" as a way to bring others out of poverty. A free market has created some of the poverty he describes in the book (ex. - the practice in Africa of selling donated clothes in markets, which led to the negative impacts on the Ghanaian textile industry). He should focus more on the topics of mixed-income neighborhoods and ethical business practices, instead o [...]

    5. Margaret on said:

      Pew sitting entrepreneurs can do more to alleviate poverty.I gave this book only four stars for the fact much of the information is a repeat from this authors previously written book "Charity Detox." Yet what is new is really quite informative. To think that so many Christians in our churches every Sunday could have the potential to alleviate poverty is worth shouting out from the pulpits. Great book.

    6. Pearson, on said:

      For readers that do charity work in outreach areas, this title has information to consider and think about in how to help" people in need" make a way out of poverty. Lupton has worked for over 40 years in the inner city of Atlanta, GA and has had success helping people advance socio-economically and,where this reader agrees with some of his premise, I do not believe that he has all the answers by any means.

    7. Bill Smith on said:

      Excellent follow-on to his previous book Toxic Charity. Both books will challenge your view of how to best serve the financial poor. Toxic Charity focuses heavily on what not to do, while this book (Charity Detox) has some examples of what we should do instead. It is not an exhaustive list, but that is because the problems are difficult and complex.

    8. Jennifer Hill on said:

      The author has good things to say about long-term results, the strengths of communities and mixed-income partnerships. Unfortunately, he seems unable to articulate why, if "enlightened self-interest" is such a no-brainer for "wealth creators," they don't already engage in the actions he claims are natural.

    9. Ellen on said:

      Not as much information on how to make changes as I'd anticipated. He spent quite a few pages reiterating points from his first book, Toxic Charity. Would have liked to see more examples & ideas of empowerment in the NGOs to the poverty stricken.

    10. Erika on said:

      Interesting ideaLike the micro perspective but I think it missed some macro issues that may inhibit self sufficiency from communities. I like the concept of introspection on our charitable contributions.

    11. Sophia Lee on said:

      A good read for anyone who ever wondered why we spend so much time and money on serving the poor yet don't see real results.

    12. Summer on said:

      Dr. Lupton is the real deal. He has done hands-on, front-line charity work for decades. When he says hand outs create a culture of dependency, it isn't reactionary justification for stinginess. On the contrary, he wants the privileged to do MORE, not less, for the poor. He just wants us to come at it from an entirely different angle. I deeply appreciated his insistence on results. His "and then what?" questions to well-meaning pastors planning charity events. His conviction that a lot of activit [...]

    13. Kristine on said:

      This book was disappointing. Twelve years ago I worked for a couple years for a non-profit that provided health care, daily meals, substance use support, mental health care, and housing support to persons in an extremely poor neighborhood of a major urban city. Now I live in a very small, almost-rural, town with a significant population of persons who have many of the same needs as those in urban settings. I was expecting Robert Lupton's book to shine a light on a serious issue and offer some us [...]

    14. Dave Martin on said:

      Robert Lupton's two recent books, Toxic Charity and Charity Detox, challenge compassionate people to think carefully about whether their contributions are achieving real results. In most cases, he argues, our generosity disempowers the poor and needy, creating dependency, passivity, and entitlement. We have become largely focused on service and activity (along with the good feelings it gives us) rather than outcomes--and the outcomes of non-emergency aid are abysmal. True charity that lifts the [...]

    15. Laura on said:

      Recommended for: Everyone in the non-profit world who is genuinely interested in moving the poverty needle and is willing to take risks. (Especially the religious groups since that is the world in which the author resides). Any businessperson who wants to do well and also do good. Chapter 7 and Chapter 8 are particularly good for the gentrifiers and the gentrified. While I don't agree with all of Lupton's points, he is absolutely correct that we cannot "serve a community out of poverty". There n [...]

    16. Virginia Birks on said:

      This book and his previous book Toxic Charity should be read and discussed by everyone involved with charitable service. His premise is that we cannot "serve" people out of poverty. We are good at service, but not so good at eliminating poverty. His suggestions are not easy to accomplish and run contrary to what we are now doing. But if he's right, we have much work to do. Minerva people, let's read and discuss.

    17. Denise Spicer on said:

      This author makes an excellent case that both charity and government handouts actually hurt the poor. (An example: the donated clothing which took ½ million jobs away from African textiles workers between 1975-2000.) He provides arguments and examples that the most effective method of poverty alleviation is economic development. Jobs are what’s needed!

    18. Kara on said:

      I didn't agree with everything in this book (or the previous one), but Lupton sure changed my mind about expectations for charities that target chronic poverty. I feel better equipped to evaluate charities I donate my time and money to and I feel inspired to participate in movements that have truly demonstrated a "return on investment" in regard to longterm charge toward self-sustainability.

    19. Nancy on said:

      I won this in a giveaway.I agree with the premise of this book that we help more by giving the poor motivation and not hand outs. There was a few times his mentioning that God was directing people directly that rubbed me the wrong way, since that is not my motivation to help others, but if the main audience for this is Christian groups then I hope it is widely read and shared.

    20. Greg Evans on said:

      Very little help to "moving the needle of poverty". A capitalist suggesting that people need jobs with a livable wage, duh!! Then seems against raising minimum wage. Spoken like a true trickle down economist. The needle did move though with this idea. But it moved the wrong way even here in America. Dissolving the middle class and creating a larger working poor, poorer, and poorest class.

    21. Charmin Foth on said:

      Rethink how you serve.This book really makes you take a hard look at how as Christians we serve those in need and gives real world examples of how we can move the poverty needle without robbing those we serve of their dignity.

    22. Becky Taylor on said:

      Everyone should read this book. Really makes you question how to do charity.

    23. Jason M Hynson on said:

      Wonderful read!5 stars because we need to think long term and not well I helped and I'm going home. I have to think about why I'm serving.

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