Inspector French's Greatest Case

Freeman Wills Crofts

You are here: Home - Uncategorized - Inspector French's Greatest Case


Inspector French's Greatest Case

Inspector French s Greatest Case Inspector French is the central figure in many books by Mr Crofts This his greatest case opens with the discovery beside the open safe of a diamond merchant in Hatton Garden of the dead body of his

  • Title: Inspector French's Greatest Case
  • Author: Freeman Wills Crofts
  • ISBN: 9780701206055
  • Page: 496
  • Format: Paperback
  • Inspector French is the central figure in many books by Mr Crofts This, his greatest case, opens with the discovery beside the open safe of a diamond merchant in Hatton Garden of the dead body of his head clerk, and valuable diamonds are missing There are many people to suspect, and before Inspector French solves it, he has to unravel many mysteries and follow up many fInspector French is the central figure in many books by Mr Crofts This, his greatest case, opens with the discovery beside the open safe of a diamond merchant in Hatton Garden of the dead body of his head clerk, and valuable diamonds are missing There are many people to suspect, and before Inspector French solves it, he has to unravel many mysteries and follow up many false clues.

    • Best Read [Freeman Wills Crofts] ✓ Inspector French's Greatest Case || [Psychology Book] PDF ↠
      496 Freeman Wills Crofts
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Freeman Wills Crofts] ✓ Inspector French's Greatest Case || [Psychology Book] PDF ↠
      Posted by:Freeman Wills Crofts
      Published :2018-04-15T07:58:39+00:00

    One thought on “Inspector French's Greatest Case

    1. Judy on said:

      A man is found dead in a London diamond merchant's offices, and it soon transpires that a large number of jewels are missing. But that's just the start of a complicated case which takes Inspector Joseph French all over Europe, including visits to Holland, France and Spain. I really enjoyed this detective novel, from 1924, the first in the long-running series featuring French. It is rather slow-building, but that's the point, as it shows the amount of painstaking, unglamorous detective work which [...]

    2. Arpita (BagfullofBooks) on said:

      In ' French's Greatest Case' we are introduced to a case of murder that occurs at the offices of Duke and Peabody, a diamond merchant located at Hatton Garden in London. On a cold night in the middle of November, the body of an employee, by the name of Mr. Charles Gething is discovered prostrate on the floor in the inner office of Mr. Duke. Mr. Duke's large Milner safe has been ransacked with the loss of thirty-three thousand pounds worth of diamonds and a thousand pounds in bank notes. Mr. Geth [...]

    3. Eric on said:

      I like Crofts' detective novels although even I find them a little wordy.Inspector French is a great character and this is a classic of dogged police work taking him to many European countries. I did work out the culprit but not too soon! Some will find the explanation a bit ponderous but, all in all this is a good classic crime story dating from 1924.

    4. Cindy on said:

      I think I would have rated this much higher if it weren't for the title. If this was Inspector French's Greatest Case, then it's no wonder that his books are virtually forgotten today.A man goes to work at a jewelry shop only to find the dead body of a senior clerk and an empty safe. French takes over the case. The investigation is described in mind-numbing detail, along with his frequent trips to Europe - the Netherlands, Spain, France, etc, which are either by rail (with the entire route caref [...]

    5. Betty on said:

      First published in 1924, this is considered one of the classics of the Golden Age of British crime fiction. The case develops step by step throughout the novel as the Inspector steadfastly follows up on leads, inching ever closer to apprehending the culprits. Very well plotted and evenly paced. Recommended for fans of British crime fiction who like puzzles and do not need chase scenes, graphic violence, or deep character development.

    6. Brian Williams on said:

      This is Inspector French’s debut mystery story, written in 1925 or so. French investigates a robbery and murder of a diamond merchant in London’s Hatton Garden. His investigation takes him all around London and also to Europe: Switzerland, Spain, France and Portugal. The exciting capture of the villain takes place in Oporto, Portugal. So in addition to the whodunit, there’s also the adventure of train and ship travel to entertain the reader.French is the narrator and star of the story. He [...]

    7. Ian on said:

      What a wonderful time I had reading this book. Having read a reprint of mystery in the channel I was used to the language and enjoyed the journey in this book the pace was different from the modern style, but was still gripping.I have fast become a fan and have already downloaded several of Freeman's books. If you can get past some of the language where people essay and ejaculate, amoung other things. Remembering the usage was very different. You should enjoy this if you like detective and polic [...]

    8. Gayle on said:

      Very enjoyable mystery in the Agatha Christie style. Lots of twists & turns.

    9. Korynn on said:

      If Inspector French is the best Scotland Yard can come up with then I understand the need for the amateur detective, give me Peter Wimsey anyday over the methodical and highly conservative Inspector. The mystery is rather straight forward, a man is murdered and jewels are stolen but French dawdles about, discounts theories, and essentially allows himself to be led by the nose by false clues without taking any action himself. He travels all over the place without really getting any value for his [...]

    10. Lisa Kucharski on said:

      The reader follows Insp. French through his meticulous investigation of a murder and theft. You really follow every lead with French and though you might find that this follow small details might be a bit boring, in actuality - it's not. There are moments where I find French a bit too trusting or naive at times when it comes to talking about the case with people involved. I figured out who the murderer was most specifically by the the time I was 3/4 through but knew that the person needed to be [...]

    11. Gerry on said:

      While this book is entitled 'Inspector French's Greatest Case', the credit should go to Mrs French whose perceptive remarks late on in the case give Inspector Joseph French a new lead and eventually this leads to the capture of the criminals.Those criminals had robbed a Hatton garden jeweller of diamonds and rubies and the manager of the shop, Duke & Peabody, is found dead on the scene. It is a most perplexing case and French has plenty of leads that take him all over the Continent but with [...]

    12. Lesley on said:

      Did I care who dunnit? only enough to flip to the end to see who it was, as how the extremely boring Inspector French got there I no longer cared. Also, unpersuaded that he would have been authorised to undertake the amount of continental jaunts necessary investigative travel that seemed to be required; also, too much in the way of disguises and false identities! (there also appeared to have been a faked death at some point.)

    13. Mikee on said:

      Crofts was at his height of popularity in the 1920s, along with Dashiell Hammett and Agatha Christie. This is his first Inspector French novel. A good book, notable for its attention to detail, and the dogged way in which French pursues his quarry. A bit drawn out, but still quite good.

    14. Elizabeth on said:

      This is truly a police procedural because the case is solved by shoe leather and following up each clue over period of weeks.

    15. Michelecislo on said:

      this book has the wonderful tone of an old fashioned Sherlock Holmes story. refreshing-good,clean gun.

    16. Nancy on said:

      A satisfying summer diversion. I enjoyed the measured pace and procedural detail of this 1920s English mystery. This is a classic that should not be forgotten.

    17. Katrina on said:

      This one was published in 1924 and I'm glad to say that Freeman Wills Crofts' later books are a lot better. This was tedious and I knew exactly what was going on from early on in the book.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *