The Sea Wolves: A History of the Vikings

Lars Brownworth

You are here: Home - Uncategorized - The Sea Wolves: A History of the Vikings


The Sea Wolves: A History of the Vikings

The Sea Wolves A History of the Vikings In AD Norse warriors struck the English isle of Lindisfarne and laid waste to it Wave after wave of Norse sea wolves followed in search of plunder land or a glorious death in battle Much of the

  • Title: The Sea Wolves: A History of the Vikings
  • Author: Lars Brownworth
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 144
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • In AD 793 Norse warriors struck the English isle of Lindisfarne and laid waste to it Wave after wave of Norse sea wolves followed in search of plunder, land, or a glorious death in battle Much of the British Isles fell before their swords, and the continental capitals of Paris and Aachen were sacked in turn Turning east, they swept down the uncharted rivers of centralIn AD 793 Norse warriors struck the English isle of Lindisfarne and laid waste to it Wave after wave of Norse sea wolves followed in search of plunder, land, or a glorious death in battle Much of the British Isles fell before their swords, and the continental capitals of Paris and Aachen were sacked in turn Turning east, they swept down the uncharted rivers of central Europe, captured Kiev and clashed with mighty Constantinople, the capital of the Byzantine Empire But there is to the Viking story than brute force They were makers of law the term itself comes from an Old Norse word and they introduced a novel form of trial by jury to England They were also sophisticated merchants and explorers who settled Iceland, founded Dublin, and established a trading network that stretched from Baghdad to the coast of North America In The Sea Wolves, Lars Brownworth brings to life this extraordinary Norse world of epic poets, heroes, and travellers through the stories of the great Viking figures Among others, Leif the Lucky who discovered a new world, Ragnar Lodbrok the scourge of France, Eric Bloodaxe who ruled in York, and the crafty Harald Hardrada illuminate the saga of the Viking age a time which has passed away, and grown dark under the cover of night.

    • ☆ The Sea Wolves: A History of the Vikings || ☆ PDF Read by ☆ Lars Brownworth
      144 Lars Brownworth
    • thumbnail Title: ☆ The Sea Wolves: A History of the Vikings || ☆ PDF Read by ☆ Lars Brownworth
      Posted by:Lars Brownworth
      Published :2018-02-14T07:35:30+00:00

    One thought on “The Sea Wolves: A History of the Vikings

    1. Ian on said:

      I guess the cover should have been a clue. There is a saying which is often quoted by historians, "History is written by the victor". That is sometimes true and perhaps most often true when the history happened 1000 years ago. I would add that readers have heard that quotation so often that when reading an historical document they keep it in mind and look for clues that might offer an insight into the perspective of the vanquished. What we never hear is that history is almost exclusively written [...]

    2. Kiwi Begs2Differ✎ on said:

      I love to read non-fiction books that, in addition to be accurate and seriously based on facts (i.e. non speculative), are also entertaining and not stiff and dry. This book is cleverly organised, the author presents the story of the Vikings in chronological order but he focuses on a geographical region at the time (e.g. France, England, Ireland, Iceland, etc.). With the scope limited in each chapter, the events in the story flow naturally and the genealogy of the relevant historical figures are [...]

    3. Rex Fuller on said:

      They didn’t come from any one place but all over Norway, Sweden, and Denmark. And they had no king, at the start. Instead, any man could gather as many followers as he could muster, and then take off for other shores plundering. Meaning to kill, rape, and steal as much as possible. Not a prescription for admiration. And they didn’t have an alphabet (only a few pictographic runes), so they kept no written record at the start. And today there are no Vikings. Long killing spree, then disappeara [...]

    4. Grumpus on said:

      Everything you wanted to know about Vikings. I don't watch The History Channel's "Vikings" show but I know the main character is Ragnar. This book details the life of the the true man, his predecessors, and his descendants. I never knew the geographic extent to which they pillaged, the sums of money given to appease them (another historical example that appeasement never works) and ultimately some legacies they left Europe and the world. It was well done and worthy of a relatively quick read.

    5. Marko Vasić on said:

      Excellent book with good references based on historical data. The truth about genuine Ragnar and Rollo conjoined one book :)

    6. Alexander Tomislav on said:

      The book is a really good account of the Viking age and their historical pervasiveness which still influences us today. The style is enjoyable and the history is unfurled in stories about the most influential people of the North who developed ships which enabled them to establish a trade network from Baghdad to North America.Despite being remembered as bloodthirsty ravagers, as Viking hammer broke up the remains of Charlemagne's empire and shaped first European centralized powers of England, Fra [...]

    7. Verity Brown on said:

      If you're looking for an exploration of Viking customs and culture, this probably isn't the book for you. Rather, it explores the profound impact of the Vikings on future history across the entire map of Europe, from Ireland to Russia to Byzantium (yes, you read that correctly--Byzantium). It's rather mindboggling to consider that Harald Hardrada--the Viking invader that the Saxons had to fight off mere weeks before they lost to the Normans (Frenchified Vikings) at Hastings--had previously trave [...]

    8. Michelle Christensen on said:

      Great book about the Vikings. I did not know very much about them at all. I have a Danish ancestor, and my husband has many Danish ancestors. This made the book even more interesting. I was fascinated to learn about how wide-spread they were throughout the world and that the Danes, Swedes, and Norse all raided different parts of the world. They started out being a group of people with many different leaders, even in their own countries. Their assimilation into a people of landowners with a domin [...]

    9. Noah Goats on said:

      This is an engaging book, a very interesting and readable introduction to that savage race of marauders, traders and explorers who made such an indelible mark on European history and the human imagination.

    10. Angela on said:

      I listened to this on audiobook, which I think made it easier to get through than if I tried to sit down and read it. This book was a more entertaining way of learning about the Viking Age as the Norse pillaged, conquered, and traded their way across a large portion of the globe. I read this directly after having listened to the Great Courses lectures on The Vikings. This book basically reiterated everything that was in that course, but in a literary form rather than lecture form. There were som [...]

    11. Chris on said:

      The Sea Wolves is a short and entertaining account Viking Age, which spanned a 200 year timeframe from the late 8th century to the mid 11th century. The story begins with the brutal attack at Lindisfarne Abbey on the northeastern coast of England in 793 AD, the event that initiates the beginning of the Viking Age. The book covers how the Scandinavian Vikings raided and/or settled in a vast amount of territory, including most of Continental Europe, the British Isles, Iceland, Greenland, the north [...]

    12. Krista on said:

      First, let me start by saying I liked this book. I think I liked this book because I am a history enthusiast. However, the book reads much like a textbook. Which took me sometime to read through. I had to re-read parts to make sure I was absorbing all the facts. I gave this book 3 stars because of how it read, (like a textbook). I thought it would read more like individual stories of the Vikings, themselves. If you are looking to get a great history on the Vikings, this is a great book. I was go [...]

    13. Alaine on said:

      Fairly short audio book, and pretty entertaining for a work of nonfiction. It wasn't a dry and boring list of dates and names. It got into the juicy stories while also laying down adequate historical background. Good to hold you over while waiting for the next season of Vikings to air. Ragnar Lothbrok is even mentioned several times. Interesting details regarding Ivar the Boneless. I think the book's idea about why he was called that sounds more realistic than how he's portrayed in the show.

    14. Dave on said:

      Review originally published at Book of BoganThe Sea Wolves is subtitled A History of the Vikings, and is an attempt at covering the influence and reach of a group of figures who have become somewhat mythologised through popular culture and society in general. I guess when we hear the word Vikings, it immediately brings to mind a particular image, and certain assumptions about them, but the truth was much more diverse, and much more interesting.I suppose one of the most surprising things for me w [...]

    15. Ray Campbell on said:

      OK, so I'm not an East Lyme Viking anymore, I'm still fascinated by Vikings! In this short history, Lars Brownworth gives names to the raiders who changed the world. Our story begins with the raid of an English monastery. Brownworth then goes on to tell the back story and name names. Throughout the study of European history, Vikings are like storms, they influence and change the course of events, but in most accounts, they have no names or backgrounds, they are simply Vikings. Like raiders from [...]

    16. Lara on said:

      I thought this wasting, sort of. I mean, I finished it this morning and already most of it is a blur, so clearly not all that memorable. The only two people I can recall are Olga (holy, shit, that woman was vengeful--she had a guy TORN IN HALF! Er that a spoiler?) and King Cnut. Wait, oh yeah, and also that Bluetooth guy, but mainly just because of, you know, bluetooth. Anyway, I didn't love the narrator, and I felt like I didn't really learn much new about the Vikings, other than their extreme [...]

    17. Sebastian Hill on said:

      This is mostly a military/political history of the Vikings. It has solid information on the vikings' explorations and conquests, their reach of Constantinople, Greenland and Newfoundland, as well as how they relate with subsequent civilizations, such as the Russians.It offers enough information for the amateur history buff without losing itself into unnecessary details. As the "Sea Wolves" title suggests, this is mostly about the viking military history and less about their daily lives, culture [...]

    18. Tawney on said:

      Lars Brownworth packs a lot of information into this survey of Viking history. The book is only about 250 pages long and covers Viking raids and invasions of Britain, Gaul and Ireland; the explorations that resulted in settlement of Iceland and Greenland; the trading excursions to the east as far as Constantinople. It fits into and fills in the more generally known European history of the time and is quite entertaining.

    19. Stacey Lynne on said:

      Good easy read on some of the more well known 'Vikings.' I wish it didn't jump around in time, as I found myself constantly going back to earlier chapters trying to determine how the dates lined up. Proof reading might have caught some of the typos. All in all, a nice brief history.

    20. Jason on said:

      Excellent!! Brutes, but not just brutes. Didn't realize the influence they had and not just when they started conquering, but even when the 'Viking' culture waned.

    21. Shane Phillips on said:

      This book was amazing. I had no idea the Vikings had that level of influence. 3 days of the week, ship terms, countries, cities and even technology all named after or by the Vikings.

    22. Heinz Reinhardt on said:

      A good introductory/primer on the age of the Vikings. The author tells the tale from the period of the Ostrogoths from Sweden (proto Vikings who pummeled the Roman Empire in it's last century of existence) all the way to the fascinating life of King Harald Hardrada who served under the Byzantine Emperor against the Muslims in the Middle East and Sicily and invaded England in 1066. Written in a clear, fast paced narrative style, the book reads quickly. The downside to this is a lack of depth and [...]

    23. John Nellis on said:

      I found this book to be a very good introductory history of the Vikings. It was very informative and gave a good account of the rise and fall of the Vikings. It was very interesting to note how great an influence the Vikings had on the medieval world. Many of their influences are still with us today. From their invasions of England and France, to the formations of great kingdoms, Normandy in France, and the Kingdom of Kiev in Russia. Kiev forming the beginnings of the formation of Russia, and No [...]

    24. Roy Helge on said:

      This book is not a history of the vikings. This is a history of british kings as it was influenced by viking raids. The vikings are objects throughout the book, never making it to be the subject of the story. The language is loaded to the point of comedy as the reasons behind, and the social structures, political battles and economical factors behind the viking expansion is never even attempted discussed. While how the viking raids affected the kings and nobles of the British isles, Russia and F [...]

    25. Kari on said:

      This is probably the best nonfiction I've read in a while. Many of the stories included in this book were incorporated in the History Channel series, "Vikings." Although the show takes serious liberties with the who, when, where aspect of the stories, it's pretty neat how it all ties together. I knew the Vikings were instrumental in setting up a centralized government in Russia and discovering and settling Iceland and Greenland, but I didn't know the scope of their influence was so wide ranging. [...]

    26. Georgene on said:

      I am not very familiar with the history of the Vikings and the impact they had on Western history. This book helped fill in a lot of the gaps in my knowledge. The Vikings, who came out of what is now Norway, Sweden and Denmark, became the base of much of the British Isles, France , Germany Western Russia, Iceland and Greenland. They even extended their reach briefly into North America. While famous for their brutal raids throughout Europe, they also established trade routes through Russia down i [...]

    27. Robert Markolovic on said:

      By far an amazing book. Many readers and people outside the world of academia would believe this book is focused on Viking violence. That is far from the truth. Yes, the book has a large focus on conquest, but it focuses on much more. The book discusses the settling and creation of Russia, the colonization of Iceland, exploration, and trade. If you want to learn about Viking history from different standpoints this is the book. The book is broken down amazingly and allows the reader to be able to [...]

    28. Scott Kirkland on said:

      Great book to read before watching The History Channels' Vikings series. You get to see all the great names as they are actually spread out over about 500 years, and not shoved in to a single television series, but then you'll get to see all the great story lines compiled in a useful way on the show. Please read for better accuracy and understanding before watching. You'll appreciate what The History Channel has done if you do.

    29. VeniciusVillasenor on said:

      A quick survey of Viking influencesA good introduction to the widespread legacy of the Vikings to the world at large. Most of history only make cursory mention of the Vikings this book shows us the wife ranging impact of the Vikings to western history. A good addition to fill up that gap in western history, understanding these Norsemen their motivation and characters partly explain western culture and motivations.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *