The Mourner's Dance: What We Do When People Die

Katherine Ashenburg

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The Mourner's Dance: What We Do When People Die

The Mourner s Dance What We Do When People Die When her daughter s fianc died suddenly Katherine Ashenburg was surprised to see how her daughter intuitively re created the traditional rituals of mourning even those of which she was ignorant Intr

  • Title: The Mourner's Dance: What We Do When People Die
  • Author: Katherine Ashenburg
  • ISBN: 9780865477056
  • Page: 325
  • Format: Paperback
  • When her daughter s fianc died suddenly, Katherine Ashenburg was surprised to see how her daughter intuitively re created the traditional rituals of mourning, even those of which she was ignorant Intrigued, Ashenburg began to explore the rich and endlessly inventive choreographies different cultures and times have devised to mark a universal and deeply felt plight.ContemWhen her daughter s fianc died suddenly, Katherine Ashenburg was surprised to see how her daughter intuitively re created the traditional rituals of mourning, even those of which she was ignorant Intrigued, Ashenburg began to explore the rich and endlessly inventive choreographies different cultures and times have devised to mark a universal and deeply felt plight.Contemporary North American culture favors a mourning that is private and virtually invisible But, as Ashenburg reveals, the grieving customs of the past were so integrated into daily life that ultimately they gave rise to public parks and ready to wear clothing Our keepsakes, prescribed bereavement garb, resting places, mourning etiquette and ways of commiserating from wakes to Internet support groups remain clues to our most elemental beliefs, and our most effective means of restoring selves, and communities, unraveled by loss.

    The Mourner s Dance What We Do When People Die by The Mourner s Dance What We Do When People Die Contemporary North American culture favors a mourning that is private and virtually invisible But, as Ashenburg reveals, the grieving customs of the past were so integrated into daily life that ultimately they Mourner s Dance Katherine Ashenburg The Mourner s Dance weaves rich scholarship through the homespun of family history, folk tradition, and manifest humanity In a way that Jessica Mitford never could, Ashenburg understands the verities of good grief and good funerals and why, to deal with Death, we must deal with our dead. The Mourner s Dance What We Do When People Die Quill The Mourner s Dance is a welcome read for those of us living in a society whose normal reaction to prolonged mourning is a brisk Get over it and get on with it Susan Gabori used a tape recorder to initiate the writing of A Good Enough Life , a series of firsthand accounts of the final stages of dying. THE MOURNER S DANCE What We Do When People Die THE MOURNER S DANCE What We Do When People Die She explores postmortem treatment of the body wakes, funeral ceremonies and prayers burial and cremation gender roles and such customs as condolence letters and mourning clothes Ashenburg s approach is thematic and selective from reburial of bones in rural Greece to suttee widow burning The Mourner s Dance What We Do When People Die by The Mourner s Dance weaves rich scholarship through the homespun of family history, folk tradition, and manifest humanity In a way that Jessica Mitford never could, Ashenburg understands the verities of good grief and good funerals and why, to deal with Death, we must deal with our dead. Devendra Banhart Mourner s Dance Music Video YouTube Oct , Album Devendra Banhart Ape in Pink Marble Devendra Banhart Mourner s Dance Video Clips Garfield A Tale of Two Kitties. The Mourner s Dance What We Do When People Die book review This scholarly examination of mourning traditions through the ages was written by Katherine Ashenburg, a journalist and lecturer, who was moved to investigate the rituals of mourning after the death of her daughter s fianc The Mourner s Dance is scholarly without being

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      325 Katherine Ashenburg
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      Posted by:Katherine Ashenburg
      Published :2018-011-24T09:51:40+00:00

    One thought on “The Mourner's Dance: What We Do When People Die

    1. Joy Galston on said:

      I turned on the radio to an interview with this author in the midst of dealing with the loss of a family member. I loved this book because it was personal and objective, at the same time. The author gave herself a job to do in response to her own family loss. This book explores practical ways to communicate and process grief based on the practices of other cultures. It gave me options to give to others who wanted to participate and support me in my grief. I wasn't expecting to laugh while readin [...]

    2. Kimberly on said:

      I loved this book. It gives a broad overview of the mourning practces of other cultures and addresses the deficiencies inherent in the way the current death averse western culture allows those in mourning to mourn and be comforted.

    3. Carol Johnson on said:

      I really enjoyed this one. Fascinating! It took me longer to read than most but it's very well written. I'm glad I picked it up!

    4. Jo-Ann on said:

      I found the material in this book engaging and thought provoking. The collection of customs among different cultures and communities is fascinating - similar in intent even when there are differences in enactment. Katherine Ashenburg's descriptions of the journeys of her daughter and other family and friends during bereavement are very moving. Greatly recommended!

    5. Paula Dembeck on said:

      Following the sudden and unexpected death of her daughter’s fiancé, Ashenburg was struck by the way her daughter responded. It seemed she just automatically took on a series of behaviors, much like those of others who have lost someone dear to them. The author watched quietly as her daughter surrounded herself with her friends, wore pieces of her fiance’s clothing and fingered some of the objects that meant so much to him. Triggered by these observations, Ashenburg decided to look at the en [...]

    6. Kim on said:

      It took me more than a year to read this book. I picked it up after a family member passed away, but I've lost a few more people over the past year and it was too painful to read.The author does a really good job of discussing the rituals and attitudes towards death in various cultures - however, if that was the main focus of the book then it would be a bit dry, like a textbook. Instead, she wraps the entire thing around the story of how her daughter's fiance died suddenly, and how her daughter [...]

    7. Cynthia K on said:

      I selected this book because I saw it tagged as self-help, and I needed such a book for the Read Harder Challenge. After reading it, I can only conclude it is categorized that way because, as Ashenburg deseribes in this microhistory, that is where you find books on how to mourn. If it weren't for the challenge, I probably would not have finished this book. I'm glad I did because it was an interesting cross-cultural comparison. Ashenburg structured the book in a way that her study of mourning cus [...]

    8. Alison Lake on said:

      Even though I am very interested in this book, I've decided to return it to the library and read it another time. After experiencing the loss of someone I love very much, it doesn't seem like the right time for me to read it.Update: I have lost two very dear people since putting this book back on the shelf a few years ago. Because of these losses, I have a renewed interest in this book and how people approach(ed) mourning and grieving in different times and cultures.

    9. Heather McLeod on said:

      I loved this book. I've been curious about death and grieving, and Ashenburg's book provides an excellent overview of how those subjects are dealt with across many different cultures and religions, as well as historically. Her writing style is sensitive and personable, not too formal or academic. I feel better equipped to comfort friends who grieve, as well as myself. I found this book very similar in approach to Margaret Visser's The Rituals of Dinner, my favourite non-fiction book.

    10. Madeleine McLaughlin on said:

      An interesting read about the customs of various people when someone dies. How we mourn is often shaped by our culture, from the Irish 'merry wake' to the Tibetan 'sky burial'. How we cope when someone dies is important to who we are and think we are, seems to be the theme of this book. If you like to read about people, this is a good book.

    11. Roma Jones on said:

      Only took me TWO MONTHS to read :/ goodness.Well researched with a lot of really cool/interesting information on the way different cultures, religious groups, and time periods deal with death and mourning. Really hard for me to get into because the way it was presented was pretty dry.

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