A Legend of the Future

Agustín de Rojas

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A Legend of the Future

A Legend of the Future The best science fiction writer in Cuba the only possible debate is which of his works is the best His trilogy of Spiral A Legend of the Future and Year is still the best of Cuban science fictio

  • Title: A Legend of the Future
  • Author: Agustín de Rojas
  • ISBN: 9781632060358
  • Page: 176
  • Format: Paperback
  • The best science fiction writer in Cuba the only possible debate is which of his works is the best His trilogy of Spiral, A Legend of the Future, and Year 200 is still the best of Cuban science fiction With a very refined style and well established scientific social background, Agust n s work surprises through its humanistic content His concerns surrounding the mean The best science fiction writer in Cuba the only possible debate is which of his works is the best His trilogy of Spiral, A Legend of the Future, and Year 200 is still the best of Cuban science fiction With a very refined style and well established scientific social background, Agust n s work surprises through its humanistic content His concerns surrounding the meaning of life and the evolution of human beings put him in a privileged place among national writers Cuenta RegresivaA morally profound chamber piece, Agust n de Rojas A Legend of the Future takes place inside a damaged spaceship following the failure of a mission to Titan, one of Saturn s moons The journey back to Earth forces the crewmembers to face their innermost fears while coexisting with each other in a state of desperation This mesmerizing novel, reminiscent of Arthur C Clarke s 2001 A Space Odyssey, is a science fiction roman clef about the intense pressures economic, ideological, psychological inside Communist CubaVIEWS The best science fiction writer in Cuba the only possible debate is which of his works is the best His trilogy of Spiral, A Legend of the Future, and Year 200 is still the best of Cuban science fiction With a very refined style and well established scientific social background, Agust n s work surprises through its humanistic content His concerns surrounding the meaning of life and the evolution of human beings put him in a privileged place among national writers Cuenta Regresiva The best and most popular novelist of this genre that the Island has ever given He is considered one of the principal exponents of Cuban science fiction, and he was undoubtedly the one who knew how to best combine solid scientific formation as plots and attractive characters with a confidence well based in humanity s socialist future Yoss One of the best science fiction writers in Cuba and, until his death , one of the best Cuban story tellers alive Today Agust n de Rojas work, from Spiral through Catharsis and Society, is admired by cult readers, pro government thinkers, and elitists alike F lix Luis Viera, Cubaencuentro The most elevated figure in Cuban science fiction Axx nABOUT THE AUTHORAgust n de Rojas 1949 2011 is the patron saint of Cuban science fiction A professor of the history of theater at the Escuela de Instructores de Arte in Villa Clara, he authored a canonical trilogy of novels consisting of Espiral Spiral, 1982 , for which he was awarded the David Prize Una leyenda del future A Legend of the Future, 1985 and El a o 200 The Year 200, 1990 , all of which are scheduled for publication in English translation by Restless Books While he was heavily influenced by Ray Bradbury and translated Isaac Asimov into Spanish, de Rojas aligned himself mostly with the Soviet line of socialist realism defined by brothers Arkady and Boris Strugatsky and Ivan Antonovich Yefremov After the fall of the Soviet Union, de Rojas stopped writing science fiction He spent his final years persuaded and persuading others that Fidel Castro did not exist.

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      176 Agustín de Rojas
    • thumbnail Title: Unlimited [Psychology Book] Ü A Legend of the Future - by Agustín de Rojas ✓
      Posted by:Agustín de Rojas
      Published :2018-08-13T20:01:45+00:00

    One thought on “A Legend of the Future

    1. Nikki on said:

      I originally received this to review via Netgalley, but took so long about it, I ended up picking it up in a shop. I’m actually not really sure what to make of it: on the one hand I found it engaging, but on the other I found the way it was set out maddening. I don’t know if this issue was deliberate, present in the original, introduced in translation, or a result of some typesetting issue, but scene breaks were several times completely elided so that one scene slid into the next and you onl [...]

    2. Book Riot Community on said:

      Described as "the patron saint of Cuban science fiction," this is the first Rojas book to be translated into English. And we are all better for it. A Legend of the Future is a survival tale that reflects the turbulence inside Communist Cuba. A crew of astronauts returning from a mission to one of Saturn's moons must deal with the shocking discovery that aliens may exist, not realizing that back on Earth, the planet is set to destruct. Roja died in 2011, but I hope we'll see more translations of [...]

    3. Dan on said:

      Review Originally Appeared on The CollagistA thawing of the icy relations between the United States and Cuba has brought a renewed interest Stateside in the Caribbean island's cultural patrimony. Cuba has a proud literary tradition dating back to the 19th-century poet and freedom fighter José Martí, whose work outside the island is largely known in song form; one of his poems was adapted into the 1960's international hit "Guantanamera" by Pete Seeger. Martí's principal contribution was a call [...]

    4. Edward Rathke on said:

      Super interesting novel. Lots of big ideas done in ways I've never seen.It's a space opera, but all the expected action is gone. In fact, as the narrative demands action, the circumstances of the characters literally forces them to inaction.It's a novel about solving puzzles, about trauma, about memory and identity and survival and even utilitarianism. The worldbuilding is really interesting and we get to some transhuman explorations, both physically and psychologically.It reminds me of the Sola [...]

    5. Nate Davis on said:

      Unique, hallucinatory, and thought-provoking. I really enjoyed this take on the psychology of group dynamics and the way it addressed the question of just what a mind can be.

    6. Sean Kottke on said:

      Comparisons to 2001: A Space Odyssey are well-earned, but underneath its enigmatic trippiness is an ultimately more accessible narrative that critiques the limitations of socialism's faith in behaviorist conditioning to reprogram the human mind. In that regard, it's more on a par with Heinlein's brand of science fiction realism in which the brave new world of space exploration and utopian technologies meets the human animal with all its primal emotions and jealousies.

    7. Ben on said:

      Some interesting ideas, for sure, but I was distracted by characters who didn't quite come across believably.ough that could have to do with the fact that this is from the 80's and translated from the original Spanish. I liked it, but wouldn't necessarily read the other two in his SF trilogy.

    8. Lisa on said:

      The setting for A Legend of the Future is (as the cover says) highly reminiscent of 2001: A Space Odyssey. It quickly descends into something much bleaker, where a group of tight-knit cosmonauts (I seriously adore that they stick with the Soviet Union word in the translation, rather than the American astronaut) are faced with their certain impending deaths. It took me a while to realize that this wasn't going to be some sort of triumphant story where the plucky characters overcome insurmountable [...]

    9. Chelsea Mcgill on said:

      A tight-knit crew of six cosmonauts has embarked on the cutting-edge ship Sviagator. Their mission: explore Titan, one of the moons of Saturn, and return the experimental ship safely to Earth. When disaster strikes, only three crewmembers survive: Isanusi, the captain, who is physically incapacitated; Thondup, an engineer and psycho-sociologist, who is emotionally fragile after the death of his partner Alix; and Gema, a physiologist whose conditioning has been activated so now she has all the sk [...]

    10. Kend on said:

      Let's face it: I'm a terrible human being. I like my science fiction to be less talk, more action. Or at least somewhat less talk, somewhat more action. Or perhaps I object to the fact that the female cosmonaut is transformed into a human computer because one of the man on the ship felt that she wasn't going to be able to handle the emotional trauma of finding out they're all going to die. Get a grip, Thondup! I mean, I know we're talking about a book published in 1985--and much of the West's sc [...]

    11. Kathy on said:

      This book is one that I will keep around on my shelves for a while. I enjoyed it and I could definitely see the Bradbury influences, so it probably helped that Bradbury is one of my favorites. For me the book really opened up and hooked me once I reached the second half. Stick with it a little bit, the style at first may be a little distracting as the POVs jump around, but it is a solid book. It captures an interesting look at group dynamics, friendships, and the true nature of humanity.

    12. Suzanne on said:

      This story of a space mission gone wrong, was interestlng but hard to get emotionally invested in. Very obviously a metaphor for Communism vs Capitalism in many fundamental ways; I find myself in the book , as in life, going against the natural order and becoming more sympathetic to Communism the older I get.

    13. Kim on said:

      The jacket said this book was part of the inspiration for "2001: A Space Odyssey," which explains why it was as long and confusing as a Kubrick film. But then again, it also raised some good HAL-like points about the thin line between manipulation and emotion when it comes to distinguishing between robot and human.

    14. Wes Lawrence on said:

      Interesting. It's a different sort of sci-fi than I'm used to. In a good way. Not so much the technology or setting, but the pacing and structure of the actual story.

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