For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood... and the Rest of Y'all Too: Reality Pedagogy and Urban Education

Christopher Emdin

You are here: Home - Uncategorized - For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood... and the Rest of Y'all Too: Reality Pedagogy and Urban Education


For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood... and the Rest of Y'all Too: Reality Pedagogy and Urban Education

For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood and the Rest of Y all Too Reality Pedagogy and Urban Education Merging real stories with theory research and practice a prominent scholar offers a new approach to teaching and learning for every stakeholder in urban education Drawing on his own experience of f

  • Title: For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood... and the Rest of Y'all Too: Reality Pedagogy and Urban Education
  • Author: Christopher Emdin
  • ISBN: 9780807006405
  • Page: 299
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Merging real stories with theory, research, and practice, a prominent scholar offers a new approach to teaching and learning for every stakeholder in urban education.Drawing on his own experience of feeling undervalued and invisible in classrooms as a young man of color and merging his experiences with than a decade of teaching and researching in urban America, award Merging real stories with theory, research, and practice, a prominent scholar offers a new approach to teaching and learning for every stakeholder in urban education.Drawing on his own experience of feeling undervalued and invisible in classrooms as a young man of color and merging his experiences with than a decade of teaching and researching in urban America, award winning educator Christopher Emdin offers a new lens on an approach to teaching and learning in urban schools He begins by taking to task the perception of urban youth of color as unteachable, and he challenges educators to embrace and respect each student s culture and to reimagine the classroom as a site where roles are reversed and students become the experts in their own learning.Putting forth his theory of Reality Pedagogy, Emdin provides practical tools to unleash the brilliance and eagerness of youth and educators alike both of whom have been typecast and stymied by outdated modes of thinking about urban education With this fresh and engaging new pedagogical vision, Emdin demonstrates the importance of creating a family structure and building communities within the classroom, using culturally relevant strategies like hip hop music and call and response, and connecting the experiences of urban youth to indigenous populations globally Merging real stories with theory, research, and practice, Emdin demonstrates how by implementing the Seven C s of reality pedagogy in their own classrooms, urban youth of color benefit from truly transformative education.Lively, accessible, and revelatory, For White Folks Who Teach in the Hoodd the Rest of Y all Too is the much needed antidote to traditional top down pedagogy and promises to radically reframe the landscape of urban education for the better.

    • Best Download [Christopher Emdin] Æ For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood... and the Rest of Y'all Too: Reality Pedagogy and Urban Education || [Self Help Book] PDF ☆
      299 Christopher Emdin
    • thumbnail Title: Best Download [Christopher Emdin] Æ For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood... and the Rest of Y'all Too: Reality Pedagogy and Urban Education || [Self Help Book] PDF ☆
      Posted by:Christopher Emdin
      Published :2018-08-22T06:06:37+00:00

    One thought on “For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood... and the Rest of Y'all Too: Reality Pedagogy and Urban Education

    1. Ioana on said:

      Excellent distillation of urban studies, race-gender oriented critical-theory, and education philosophy applied to the urban classroom, for a non-academic audience. This book was written for me (And for you, too, especially if you teach or are interested in the education debates). A personal anecdote: Kids hang out in my room after school, including many I don't teach (they come with friends). Anyways, the other day, I had to kick everyone out due to a faculty morale-building activity (well so t [...]

    2. Ben Babcock on said:

      This review is lengthy and also gets quite personal, since I can’t help but examine For White Folks Who Teach in the Hoodand the Rest of Y’all Too in the light of my own experiences as a teacher;DR: Christopher Emdin is awesome, and this book is too. It’s short and accessible, but it has such staying power. I wish this were mandatory in teacher training everywhere. Also, minor spoilers for Anne of Green Gables in the next paragraph. Don’t say I didn’t warn you.When I was a wee boy, I r [...]

    3. Khama Weatherspoon on said:

      This style of teaching is unreal. The author makes it seem like urban children are hard-wired to rowdy, boisterous, and overly-social, and that we should accept that as part of black and brown culture and recalibrate our teaching to accommodate it. As a black man, I disagree with almost all that he has written.but the author would most likely say that I'm a traitor/sell-out who has stripped myself of my real true identity in order to appease white traditional AmericaThis man is insaneIf you want [...]

    4. Ellie on said:

      For White Folks Who Teach in the Hoodd the Rest of Y'all Too: Reality Pedagogy and Urban Eduction, by Christopher Emdin, is a fascinating and exciting work that challenges teachers who work in urban environments "in the hood" as to how they approach their work, adapt their teaching practice to the needs and the strengths of their students, and reflect upon their own biases and willingness to change.The book brought to the surface assumptions I was unaware that I even had which was, at times, unc [...]

    5. Terynce on said:

      Handshakes? "Take 'em to church?" This book really and truly is for white folks that teach in the hood. Here's the trick to effective teaching: see your students as individuals and recognize that they may have a different background or experiences than you. Work hard to reach them anyway and check your biases -- we all have them; don't disregard them, but be aware and acknowledge them. I'm hesitant to give a harsh review of this book because for someone it may be beneficial. For me, I was waitin [...]

    6. Shawn Towner on said:

      The introduction and conclusion should be required reading for any teacher, not just those who teach in urban schools. The chapters based around the "Seven C's" of reality pedagogy didn't feel as revelatory to me. There are good ideas for teachers, even teachers like me who don't teach in diverse/urban schools, but what I want to see from a book like this is how to change not just classroom instruction but the values education is built upon. Some ideas (like the cogen/cypher) I could see teacher [...]

    7. Ivonne Rovira on said:

      Christopher Emdin is no LouAnne Johnson. She’s best known for her book “My Posse Don't Do Homework”, which served as — very loosely — the basis for the movie Dangerous Minds, starring Michelle Pfeiffer. But her tour de force is her primer on teaching in urban schools, Two Parts Textbook, One Part Love: A Recipe for Successful Teaching — the greatest book I’ve ever read on teaching. Period!It would be unfair to compare For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood and the Rest of Y’all To [...]

    8. Kris Sieloff on said:

      Should be required reading in teacher education programs. I wish I had read a book like this when I was an undergrad education major. Twenty four years in the classroom later, all of this book rings true to me.

    9. Kathrina on said:

      Great stuff. Scholarly, but also conscientious of real-world circumstances; very successful in reframing what it means to teach, what it means to be schooled. I'm teaching a course called Language & Learning this year, and I'm adding this title to the list of group book talks. I anticipate some great, mind-widening discussions.

    10. Steven Baumann on said:

      Teachers are taught to use evidence-supported pedagogy. Unfortunately, much of teacher education is based on unsupported flashy-idea pedagogy and catchphrases that change rapidly. If you are looking for pedagogy supported by evidence or quantitative or even deep qualitative research, this is simply not the book. For a book with 210 pages, five pages of notes or one piece of research per chapter is simply not enough. What is unfortunate is that Dr. Emdin scratches the surface of ideas that have p [...]

    11. Sydney Lewis on said:

      This book was hard to read as a "white folk who taught in the hood" because it made me very aware of the hundreds of things I did wrong and the privilege I did not check nearly enough during my time in the classroom. I think it's definitely, 100% worth reading if you plan to teach in a school that serves students of color.That being said, this book focuses primarily on teaching black students, which made it less personally relevant to my own teaching experience; almost 100% of my students were L [...]

    12. Heather on said:

      I feel incredibly grateful to be working with educators who assigned this reading to our staff. This book is meant to be discussed, and I cannot wait to do so with my team and family. I would argue that this is not just a book about great teaching "in the hood", but a book about straight up great teaching -- which is educating in a way that validates and celebrates kids, people and communities (not standardized tests). I'm excited to implement many of the steps outlined right away, and am partic [...]

    13. Jackalacka on said:

      A great topic to talk about but he repeats himself and rambles and takes too long to get his tips across. Maybe it's good for total newbies?? I feel like it could have been tightened up. Also, some of his tips aren't helpful for the average teachers. Who has time to play b-ball after work with kids(much less enough skill to be allowed to play with them?) or the flexibility to form rap sessions in class in a regular basis?

    14. Seamus Ronan on said:

      Anyone who is remotely interested in urban education should read this book. Administrators, educators, parents, policymakers, whatever. Emdin sheds true light on the darkened stereotypes of neo-indigenous urban youth and actively seeks to break the system through his reality pedagogy. The title made me feel uncomfortable, and it's supposed to.

    15. Meg Petersen on said:

      This is a very different kind of education book. Although it is theoretically based, it does not focus on theory, and although it contains very practical suggestions, it does not focus on instruction either. The main focus of this book is on how we teach across difference, how we bridge gaps between our own backgrounds and those of our students. Emdin refers to urban, black students as the neoindigenous and sets up a comparison with how indigenous students were miseducated in the infamous Indian [...]

    16. Annah on said:

      Emdin discusses the importance of engaging neoindigenous context as a pedagogical tool, particularly by teachers who don't share the cultural background of their students. Truly an average rating: I either loved a chapter or I hated it. There's a lot of anthro/soc, which I love, and the book certainly challenges what's comfortable/necessary/possible in the classroom. The thing that bothered me most was the arrogance in how one-sided the discussion of context was, which strikes me as unsustainabl [...]

    17. Pete on said:

      I'm glad I read this. It has a lot of rich passages and chapters that reminded me of what a highly engaged classroom can look like for kids from "the hood". My overall take on the book, though, is that it would have been a good book for me to read 10 years ago, when I was still new to the profession of teaching--and new to teaching kids from "the hood". The *now* me would have liked to have seen Dr. Emdin use the phrase "cultural appropriation" just once. (Just once!!) So, white teachers, please [...]

    18. Beth on said:

      I seem to be the only person that didn't love this book. Maybe I have just been reading too many professional books lately, but I actually didn't finish it. I am worried I missed all of the good stuff. It isn't that I don't agree with many of the points in the book, I do, I just couldn't get into the writing style, I suspect. I will also comment that Emdin's suggestions are just good teaching, not necessarily particular to one group of students.

    19. Nicole Means on said:

      Although I do not teach in the “hood,” I believe that Christopher Emdin’s research is very applicable even in the rural context. What I really loved about this wonderful resource is that it provides so many strategies for teachers to help the disinterested become interested. Oftentimes we mistake disinterest for lack of ability, but once we understand the context from which our kids come; however, Emdin asserts, that once understand the context from which our kids come, we might realize th [...]

    20. Michelle Kuhn on said:

      This book was really helpful for me as I consider the complicated relationship race plays in my educational context in the South Bronx. I was challenged by the way Emdin calls out the white savior complex many urban teacher prep programs perpetuate, and also by the creative ways he calls teachers to make their educational practice more culturally responsive- in language, dress, and classroom practices that are more liberatory. This was a great follow-up to my recent read of of the philosophical [...]

    21. Alicia on said:

      I'm bummed that the digital version I downloaded expired before I could pull the quotes and bookmarks that I saved, but alas, I know we will be getting several copies for our professional section in the library and I'll go back to re-read/skim. It's an important addition to our professional collection and references other professional texts that we also have. I like that it's contemporary and posits the reality pedagogy where he details specific actionable items but also details them in a way th [...]

    22. Jennifer Mangler on said:

      I'm torn on this book. There are elements I found thought-provoking, and there are elements I found problematic. The beginning of the book was the best part, as it helped me critically reflect on my experiences, and how the preconceptions I bring into the classroom have shaped what I do and why I do it. The later parts of the book reminded me very much of my student teaching experience, when I realized my cooperating teacher was trying to shape me into another him and I struggled to figure out w [...]

    23. Adam on said:

      One of the most compelling books I've read on American education. Would highly recommend to my fellow educators, especially those involved in working with minority and low-income students.

    24. Emily Sims on said:

      Summary: This book is about an African American, now teacher, who felt misrepresented and under appreciated in school. He writes about the different perspectives students and teachers have and how the culture from which one comes impacts their learning and school experiences. Evaluation: I absolutely loved this book and would highly recommend educators or future educators to read it. It is very descriptive and provides many examples that the author has first-hand experienced. This book would be [...]

    25. Mark Schlatter on said:

      I had heard a lot about this book and given that I am a white teacher in a school that is 90% students of color, I thought I would take a look.Note 1: Given the title, this book is somewhat more academic than I expected. That’s not necessarily a bad thing, since Emdin mixes in a lot of personal stories, but at times it’s a difficult read. Emdin uses the term neoindigenous to refer to populations of students who, while not indigenous themselves, face many of the same issues (labelling, invisi [...]

    26. Tara Brown on said:

      **This review is for the audiobook on Audible**I purchased the audiobook For White Folks Who Teach in the Hoodd the Rest of Y'all Too: Reality Pedagogy and Urban Education by Christopher Emdin, Narrated by JD Jackson last school year when it first became available on Audible. The sample had me engaged almost immediately, but I waited to listen to it until now because with summer break it ending, I wanted these ideas fresh in my mind as the new school year begins. I am going into my 19th year tea [...]

    27. Ben on said:

      Emdin's main premise here is that, similar to Native Americans who have been schooled in ways that erase their culture and language, urban students of colour are further marginalized by teachers who silence their experiences and devalue their communities. It's a bold claim, but perhaps because I have taught both Native American students in New Mexico and students of colour in New York City, the parallels between the indigenous and "neo-indigenous" pedagogies is striking to me.This doesn't mean t [...]

    28. Deborah Baker on said:

      I teach in a low income area, one might say the hood.But I can't help but notice that hood is synonymous with black here.Some of these strategies do not work for a lot of my first generation immigrant families.But this book had me thinking, I would have to take breaks just to process. Interesting.Bout to go buy some sneakers

    29. Rose Peterson on said:

      The first three chapters of this book were compelling and accessibly theoretical, but the 7 C's that followed felt overly prescriptive. I wish the book had focused more on explaining the nuance of terms like "neoindigenous," "reality pedagogy," and "Pentecostal pedagogy" instead of giving step-by-step guides to specific classroom procedures. Additionally, Emdin writes, "If one feels like what they have to say is of value in a particular place, they are more apt to transform the place into a comm [...]

    30. Anna on said:

      Lost a star for me because gender is either ignored or treated in a problematic way. Ex: Barbershop and Beauty Salon chapter covers barbershops and occasionally throws in the phrase "and beauty salons." In another chapter, seems like author is throwing shade at a colleague who won't "break a sweat on the playground" to connect with her students outside the classroom. Otherwise a great analysis of cultural miscommunications that derail classroom learning and connection. Lots of good examples for [...]

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *