Boys Among Men: How the Prep-to-Pro Generation Redefined the NBA and Sparked a Basketball Revolution

Jonathan Abrams

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Boys Among Men: How the Prep-to-Pro Generation Redefined the NBA and Sparked a Basketball Revolution

Boys Among Men How the Prep to Pro Generation Redefined the NBA and Sparked a Basketball Revolution The definitive never before told story of the prep to pro generation those basketball prodigies who from to made the jump directly from high school to the NBA When Kevin Garnett shocked th

  • Title: Boys Among Men: How the Prep-to-Pro Generation Redefined the NBA and Sparked a Basketball Revolution
  • Author: Jonathan Abrams
  • ISBN: 9780804139250
  • Page: 128
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The definitive, never before told story of the prep to pro generation, those basketball prodigies who from 1995 to 2005 made the jump directly from high school to the NBA When Kevin Garnett shocked the world by announcing that he would not be attending college as young basketball prodigies were expected to do but instead enter the 1995 NBA draft directly from high schooThe definitive, never before told story of the prep to pro generation, those basketball prodigies who from 1995 to 2005 made the jump directly from high school to the NBA When Kevin Garnett shocked the world by announcing that he would not be attending college as young basketball prodigies were expected to do but instead enter the 1995 NBA draft directly from high school, he blazed a trail for a generation of teenage basketball players to head straight for the pros That trend would continue until the NBA instituted an age limit in 2005, requiring all players to attend college or another developmental program for at least one year Over that decade plus period, the list of players who made that difficult leap includes some of the most celebrated players of the modern era Garnett, Kobe Bryant, LeBron James, Dwight Howard, Tracy McGrady, and numerous other stars It also includes notable busts who either physically or mentally proved unable to handle the transition But for better or for worse, the face of the NBA was forever changed by the prep to pro generation In compelling, masterfully crafted prose, Boys Among Men goes behind the scenes and draws on hundreds of firsthand interviews to paint insightful and engaging portraits of the most pivotal figures and events during this time Award winning basketball writer Jonathan Abrams has obtained remarkable access to the key players, coaches, and other movers and shakers from that time, and the result is a book packed with rare insights and never before published details about this chapter in NBA history Boys Among Men is a thrilling, informative, must read for any basketball fan.

    • Ö Boys Among Men: How the Prep-to-Pro Generation Redefined the NBA and Sparked a Basketball Revolution || ☆ PDF Read by ☆ Jonathan Abrams
      128 Jonathan Abrams
    • thumbnail Title: Ö Boys Among Men: How the Prep-to-Pro Generation Redefined the NBA and Sparked a Basketball Revolution || ☆ PDF Read by ☆ Jonathan Abrams
      Posted by:Jonathan Abrams
      Published :2018-08-26T19:47:37+00:00

    One thought on “Boys Among Men: How the Prep-to-Pro Generation Redefined the NBA and Sparked a Basketball Revolution

    1. Lance on said:

      In 1995, the Minnesota Timberwolves shook up the culture of the NBA by selecting Kevin Garnett with the fifth pick of the draft. The reason that this was highly unusual was that Garnett never played a second of college basketball – he was drafted straight out of high school. While Garnett was not the first player to have ever gone from high school to the pros, he was the first of a new generation of players that would make the transition. This generation of players and what it did to the game [...]

    2. Benoit Lelièvre on said:

      Fantastic book. Black metal, capital punishment and the NBA Draft are the three things I know way too much about in life, yet the prep-to-pro generation still held many mysteries to me. There were so many extreme cases: Kevin Garnett, LeBron James and Kobe Bryant on one side and Kwame Brown, Korleone Young and Lenny Cooke on the other. Jonathan Abrams did a killer job at getting into the lives of these mysterious super athletes who tantalized a generation of NBA scouts, these weird creatures tha [...]

    3. Charity on said:

      Disclaimer I won a copy of this via a Giveaway. My rating and thoughts on the book have nothing to do with this, if I had found the book disappointing or lacking I would express this.I hate the term "must-read," but this book for a fan of the NBA is a must-read. Abrams has a great voice and writes a riveting look of the NBA, it's players, and those players that were not able to rise to the level needed. It is fascinating and full of interesting little tidbits about players and teams that before [...]

    4. Kyle on said:

      After reading this book I'm more convinced than ever that the NBA age limit is wrong. In Chapter 21, Abrams lays it all out. Think Kwame Brown was a bust and a cautionary tale? Kwame Brown made $60 million dollars over his 13 year career. Eddie Curry never lived up to his potential? How does $70 million over 12 years sound. Yes some players might not have the mental toughness to make it in the NBA. But does a year of college really help? Leon Smith ended up struggling with psychological issues w [...]

    5. Matt on said:

      Originally reviewed on: batsarenotbugs/2016/01This April will mark the 10th anniversary of when the NBA set their current age limit of 19, effectively banning the practice of players jumping directly from high school to the pros. Unless Gerald Green has a late-career renaissance or something we all have a decent idea of how these prep-to-pro players have generally panned out in the pros. The route has yielded some major hits (Moses Malone, Kobe Bryant, Lebron James) and misses (Lenny Cooke, Taj [...]

    6. Oliver Bateman on said:

      The Abrams "prep-to-pro" essays that ran on the late, sorta-great Grantland (sorta-great at least in the beginning of its run, before it devolved into a bunch of 200-word Rembert Browne shitposts) were appointment reading. Each one was the result of careful, focused reporting; each one yielded a single coherent story.This book, however, is a mishmash of that stuff, along with some new material, in a mostly chronological account that does a disservice to the source material. At this point, when l [...]

    7. Aaron on said:

      Good book, but as a college basketball fan, I thought it had holes. It seems as though the author went in with the notion the "preps to pros" route is the "right" route, and went about trying to prove it throughout the book. Much more time was spent focusing on the success stories like LeBron and Kobe, then failures like Robert Swift and Leon Smith. the failures were covered, but not to the degree I;d hoped.

    8. Kenneth on said:

      Jonathan Abrams is the freaking man.I've read a bunch of his oral histories, so I was pretty excited when I found out he was coming out with an even longer and more in depth look at the NBA. I loved how he weaved in and out between timelines, players, coaches, and themes. Although it loosely follows a chronological order, its not a simple march down a timeline. He pulls the best content for the best moment to paint the picture he sees as the truth.In a lot of ways he reminds me of this college p [...]

    9. Shaun on said:

      I received a copy of this book for free through a First Reads giveaway."Boys Among Men" is a fantastic look at the years when many high school basketball players had the option of going directly into the National Basketball Association. The stories about the players featured are well researched and detailed. The author does a great job of including the obvious success stories like Kevin Garnett, while also addressing the 'what could have been' stories like Lenny Cooke. It's both a celebration o [...]

    10. Hans Kristensen on said:

      This is a great book. Abrams gets you into the heads of the players, coaches and officials he writes about and behind the scenes of some historic events and decisions. The writing is crisp and fast paced. After reading it I am convinced the all high school athletes should go to college for two years. This will mature their games, their bodies and ultimately themselves. If you are a basketball fan but and read this book

    11. Sandi on said:

      A well researched and written look at the group of young men who went directly to the NBA after high school and how they impacted the league. As someone who has always felt that the minimum age rule that the NBA now has is wrong, this book did reinforce my views but also presented the association's side.

    12. Dash Williams on said:

      Excellent look at the time in NBA history in which GMs chased the next Moses Malone.

    13. Riley Haas on said:

      This is a pretty excellent narrative history of the one and only generation of NBA stars to come directly from high school. Though I have one minor quibble, I got over it and, for the most part, it's probably the definitive book about this topic.Initially, I was put off by the paragraphing, which felt highly idiosyncratic. At times, a paragraph was a sentence. At other times, it was two or three ideas. I am familiar with Abrams' fantastic oral histories and, to me, this style seemed like it was [...]

    14. John on said:

      This is an incredibly interesting look from all angles of the era of high school players joining the NBA. From stars like LeBron James and Kevin Garnett to busts like Kwame Brown and Robert Swift to the forgotten like Bill Willoughby and Lenny Cooke, this book covers everyone. Of the details of its history, it was most interesting to see how the high school generation was so heavily influenced by the shoe industry. It's great to read about loopholes in the system that let all this happen, the mo [...]

    15. Jonson on said:

      This is a bit of a fun conundrum - it's the story of the American spy ring put into place by George Washington written by an Englishman who (from what I can tell) lives in America. As such, it's one of my favorite ways to read history; that is, it's history told (sort of) from the losing side. I'm always more interested in how the losers tell the story of big historical events and, as an American, there isn't a much bigger event in my cultural mainstay than the American Revolution. Add to the in [...]

    16. Ted F on said:

      I won this book as a giveaway and, as a fan of Abrams, was excited to give it a shot. Boys Among Men is interesting, informative, and extremely well written. It's clear throughout that Abrams has great skill as a researcher and interviewer, but even more impressive is his ability to convey his findings to his readers without bombarding them with facts. I learned new things about well known prep-to-pro legends (Kobe, KG, T-Mac) and was introduced to guys from this generation that were previously [...]

    17. Daniel Lanza on said:

      In Boys Among Men, author Jonathan Abrams writes about when high school basketball athletes went straight to the NBA. This book doesn’t give an opinion either way. It allows you to form your own. And that’s what was the most interesting to me. It allowed me to create an opinion based off of the true events. It put me in the middle of the events and allowed me to wonder if I would do the same as these athletes. It proved that issues that seem black and white are actually mostly grey. Decision [...]

    18. Micah on said:

      So this books point is that if kids go to the NBA out of high school then people will try to exploit them at younger ages, ignoring entirely that the NCAA exploits them as well. The book only casually mentions how the sham of amateurism is the crux of the problem with young athletes. It focuses on every failed high school to nba prospect ignoring all the four year college players who failed and ended up in hard times. It never looks to the source of the problem, which is an unequal distribution [...]

    19. Glen on said:

      I won this book in a drawing.This is a book that tells the stories of the lives of various basketball stars who came to the NBA right out of high school. Many were successful, some weren't. I especially liked the recap of Moses Malone's career.However, the book doesn't really do what it promised. Outside of scouting, it doesn't really illustrate how taking kids from high school changed the NBA. A related subject, how this changed the college game isn't gone into at all.Still, the biographies ar [...]

    20. Robert S on said:

      Boys Among Men does a good job of exploring some of the biggest names (successes and busts) from the brief time where high schoolers began to rule the NBA before the league implemented an age minimum.My only complaint about the book is the (mostly) lacking examination of the NCAA's role in causing many potential student athletes to cut out the middle man and just jump ship.If I grew up in a cycle of poverty, facing eating ramen every day to get through some college classes or taking a couple mil [...]

    21. Jonathan Coffman on said:

      A must read for anyone that has an opinion on the one-and-done rule, or simply enjoys professional basketball. It's refreshing to read Jonathan Abrams' professional writing style, avoiding the conversational tone of many other (great) basketball books. This focuses on the unbelievable stories of high school stars and their missteps, and Abrams handles it very well. This is the best basketball book I have read, can't recommend it enough

    22. Barnabas Piper on said:

      Abrams writes this brilliantly, telling the stories of individual athletes as well as e big picture story of the NBA and NCAA. This generation of players defined my early fandom, so I found the back stories intriguing and important. Abrams also makes a pretty effective case through his story telling for allowing prep players into the NBA too.

    23. Anthony Hiltz on said:

      GREATLY enjoyed reading this book and getting a glimpse into the lives of NBA players that skipped college to go straight to the NBA. I wish they were still allowed to do that. Seems foolish that they aren’t.

    24. Bart Wojdynski on said:

      Good insights in places, and some nice reporting catching up the guys who attempted the prep-to-pro route and hit bumps in the road. In terms of flow, and avoiding repetition, and depth, though, there's room for this to have been even better (and longer).

    25. Liz Wagenseller on said:

      Developed a new perspective on this issue. An immense talent can result in immensely difficult decisions to make.

    26. Allen Adams on said:

      themaineedge/sports/boAs this year’s NCAA basketball tournament gets set to tip off, we’re going to be deluged with talk about March Madness. One of the terms that we’re going to hear a lot is “one and done,” describing players who – thanks to the NBA’s age requirement – are spending the requisite one year in college before declaring for the draft and heading off into the world of professional hoops.But it wasn’t always that way.Jonathan Abrams’s new book “Boys Among Men: H [...]

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