Little Nothings 1: The Curse of the Umbrella

Lewis Trondheim

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Little Nothings 1: The Curse of the Umbrella

Little Nothings The Curse of the Umbrella The great talent behind the new generation in Europe the Dungeon series A L I E E E N and Mr O pours his heart out in funny snippets of everyday life His paranoia little annoyances big annoyances

  • Title: Little Nothings 1: The Curse of the Umbrella
  • Author: Lewis Trondheim
  • ISBN: 9781561635238
  • Page: 284
  • Format: Paperback
  • The great talent behind the new generation in Europe, the Dungeon series, A.L.I.E.E.E.N and Mr O, pours his heart out in funny snippets of everyday life His paranoia, little annoyances, big annoyances, chase of rainbows, love of comics, travel impressions from around the world, dealing with kids, being a kid it s all about life as we know it A collection from his comiThe great talent behind the new generation in Europe, the Dungeon series, A.L.I.E.E.E.N and Mr O, pours his heart out in funny snippets of everyday life His paranoia, little annoyances, big annoyances, chase of rainbows, love of comics, travel impressions from around the world, dealing with kids, being a kid it s all about life as we know it A collection from his comics blog that expands his palette with full color painting, one can only be awed at Trondheim s uncanny sense of observation and relate to all his experiences closely Another touch of genius by one of today s best and most influential comic artists.

    • ☆ Little Nothings 1: The Curse of the Umbrella || ☆ PDF Download by ☆ Lewis Trondheim
      284 Lewis Trondheim
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      Posted by:Lewis Trondheim
      Published :2019-01-18T03:50:28+00:00

    One thought on “Little Nothings 1: The Curse of the Umbrella

    1. Matt on said:

      I think James Kochalka's American Elf deserves the credit it gets. It's a good and entertaining journal comic, and is definitely the best Kochalka that I've read.That said, Trondheim's "Little Nothings" put all other journal comics to shame. It's not just his mastery of the form-- his highly detailed watercolors and masterful development of themes and even storylines in his own life is extraordinary. Even better, though, is his sense of humor. Trondheim is a master of delivery, and whether he's [...]

    2. Mjhancock on said:

      I wound up enjoying this book more than I thought I would. Essentially, it tells of Trondheim's life as he does little things: inadvertently kill houseplants, play with a cat, accept a grand prize for artistic excellence (okay, maybe not that last one). I know Trondheim from the Dungeon series, and I didn't think that style would translate well into something comparatively low key, but it works really well here. It reminded me of Guy Delisle's stuff, in its artistic simplicity and low-key, autob [...]

    3. Jamil on said:

      the best bits are the interactions at Angouelme between Trondheim & other cartoonists (Joann Sfar, Christophe Blain, Moebius) drawn in his inimitable anthropormophic style. these comics were all originally part of his blog. i also liked his relentless (okay just two) criticisms of CSI, "The series that's neither for scriptwriters nor scientists." it's not gonna win him the grand prize at Angouelme or anything, but it has that nice slight observational humor about it that Seinfeld raised Amer [...]

    4. Blue on said:

      Someone mentioned that Trondheim is a "parisian Woody Allen" and I think that's spot on. I love Trondheim's Mister I and Mister O stuff. He is utterly funny and thought-provoking. And I enjoy autobiographical graphic novels. And I did, I suppose, but not as much as I would have liked, precisely because Trondheim is too much like Woody Allen (I don't like Woody Allen in his films.) Sometimes it is really funny, and sometimes downright annoying. Nevertheless, the drawings are exactly the good stuf [...]

    5. Eric T. Voigt on said:

      I forgot November only had 30 days, and that I was starting this on November 30, and thought I'd be able to squeeze this onto my Fall shelf, and start Winter off with "Infinite Jest," and be able to look at my Winter shelf and see "Infinite Jest" there, pristine in its solitude, but that all fell apart like a goddamn burrito. Anyhow, this book is pretty quaint. The least exciting pages still left me feeling a "Hm. Well then" of contentment. It was worth the risk.

    6. Abby on said:

      This one lived up to its title, but in a good way. I love Trondheim's sketchy little drawings that float on the page, unencumbered by panel borders, and how he draws his people with animal faces (reminds me of Jason, one of my favorites). I also like his self-deprecating, charmingly paranoiac personality. This is the good side of autobio comics -- little riffs on the small pleasures and annoyances of modern life.

    7. Jim on said:

      I can't believe I forgot to add these to my books. This is the first of a series of autobiographical comics by French cartoonist, Lewis Trondheim.I really loved this book. He draws himself and other people as anthropomorphic animals, as he illustrates those little moments of confusion, frustration and triumph in his life. There is plenty here that we can all identify with. I recommend his books.

    8. Korynn on said:

      Lewis Trondheim's creates a series of personal vignettes from his life, the most entertaining of which are his views on his work in comics, and his actions when left alone with his children' lightsaber. A well-sketched portrait of the artist himself and his personal superstitions and a wonder if people working in comics ever really need to grow up?

    9. Joe Decie on said:

      My favourite of the Little Nothings series. Basically diary comics, but as the author is one of France's most celebrated (rightly so) cartoonists you get a nice insight into his life, very easy to read.

    10. Ruby on said:

      Beautiful, simple watercolours. A sort of autobiographical comic, where people are depicted as different kinds of animals and birds-although it doesn't seem to mean much, (if at all?) which kind of animal or bird someone is. Very well done, full of the irony of life.

    11. John on said:

      Droll and delightful. Why didn't anyone tell me about Tronheim ten year's ago???

    12. Katie on said:

      For whatever reason, I found this to be middle-aged humor. I couldn't get into it.

    13. scarlettraces on said:

      wasn't sure at first but ended up being completely charmed. will have to look out his narrative stuff.

    14. Ashley on said:

      SOOOO good. Little snippets from an artist's life. Very human and funny and insightful. LOVED it.

    15. Tita on said:

      I've only got the book today and haven't done reading it. I like it a lot, so far.

    16. Enzo on said:

      Trondheim's watercolor style is gorgeous -- to say nothing of his characters.

    17. J. on said:

      A collection of Trondheim's slice-of-life comics. I think Trondheim and I look at the world the same way, so I find his jokes particularly funny.

    18. Lauren on said:

      I really enjoyed these strips of everyday life. Very funny and oh-so-relatable! My only question is why is he a duck?

    19. Dru on said:

      A slice of life comic, with each page telling a little story. Lewis gives his take on the life of the artist.

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